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Monday, 26 September 2011

Marx and Alienation Essays on Hegelian Themes Sean Sayers

Marx and Alienation

Essays on Hegelian Themes

Sean Sayers



What does Marx mean by 'alienation'? What role does the concept play in
his critique of capitalism and his vision of a future society?

Marx and Alienation deals in depth with some of the most important
philosophical assumptions of Marx's work. It sets Marx's account of
alienation and its overcoming in the context of the Hegelian philosophy
from which it derives, and discusses it in relation to contemporary
debates and controversies. It challenges recent accounts of Marx's
theory, and shows that knowledge of Hegel's philosophy is essential for
an understanding of central themes in Marx's philosophy.

Marx and Alienation explains and discusses Marx's ideas in an original
and accessible fashion and makes a major contribution to Marxist
philosophy.

 SEAN SAYERS is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Kent He has
 written extensively on Marxist and Hegelian philosophy. He is the
 founder and editor of the online Marx and Philosophy Review of Books.

 Palgrave Macmillan 2011 - ISBN 9780230276543 - Hardback £50.00

Political Economy After Economics: Scientific Method and Radical Imagination David Laibman Routledge, 2012. Pp, xix, 236

Political Economy After Economics: Scientific Method and Radical Imagination
David Laibman
Routledge, 2012.  Pp, xix, 236   Hardcover, $130.


CONTENTS

Introduction

1  Value and the quest for the core of capitalism

2  Rhetoric and substance in value theory: an appraisal of the new orthodox Marxism

3  Technical change, accumulation, and the rate of profit revisited

4  Okishio and his critics: historical cost vs. replacement cost

5  Is there a classical theory of supply and demand?

6  Rationing and price control

7  Non-constant returns, Pareto optimality, and competitive equilibrium

8  Broadening the theory of aggregate supply: a "New Critical" proposal

9  Revisioning socialism: the Cherry Esplanade Conjecture

10  Incentive design, iterative planning, and local knowledge in a maturing socialist economy